My Thoughts on Proper Governance

Posted: August 18, 2012 by sjdixierose in Uncategorized
Tags: , ,
by Shirley Jean Dobler

I can not in good conscious support a philosophy based on covetousness and theft. It is offensive to me when people look to government as they would to God, as if dancing before the golden calf. I feel that the slaughter of the innocent and particularly partial birth abortion is immoral, compared to which “water boarding” is a spa treatment.

I cannot in good conscious support elected representatives who propose legislation that is a violation of the constitution and it does not matter to me whose “side” they are on.

The proper responsibility of government is to provide a frame work of justice when life, property or liberty is violated and to help protect our borders. So it only follows that I do not believe you can “provide for the public good” by violating rights of law abiding citizens to life, liberty and pursuit of property.

Sir William Blackstone, quotes about Constitution: ”The public good is in nothing more essentially interested, than in the protection of every individual’s private rights.”

To me a campaign promise to only tax the rich is immoral. People should be taxed equally and it would be a VERY small amount if government was constrained from doing things it should not do. Taxation should be a fee for services rendered. Government should provide infrastructure and make sure the playing field is safe and that the rules are fair (like for instance, interstate commerce)

Alabama, Declaration of Rights Article I Section 35, quotes about Constitution: “That the sole object and only legitimate end of government is to protect the citizen in the enjoyment of life, liberty, and property, and when the government assumes other functions it is usurpation and oppression.”

We are the people, and we should all take the time to read and reread our constitution and other freedom documents and understand the principles upon which our nation was founded.

John Adams 2nd U.S. President and Signer of the Declaration of Independence wrote this on June 28, 1813, in a letter to Thomas Jefferson. “The general principles on which the fathers achieved independence were the general principles of Christianity. I will avow that I then believed, and now believe, that those general principles of Christianity are as eternal and immutable as the existence and attributes of God.”

It is the responsibility of We the People to hold politicians and government in check, and not give up core values and principle for entitlement programs or any other enticement.

John Hancock, first Signer of the Declaration of Independence
“Resistance to tyranny becomes the Christian and social duty of each individual. … Continue steadfast and, with a proper sense of your dependence on God, nobly defend those rights which heaven gave, and no man ought to take from us.” –History of the United States of America, Vol. II, p. 229.

The government does not create wealth, whatever comes from the government has to be taken from those who create. I believe it is immoral and stupid to continue punishing those who provide jobs and keep the economy moving. The parable of the talents comes to mind. Matthew 25: 14-29

You cannot bring about prosperity by discouraging thrift.
You cannot help small men by tearing down big men.
You cannot strengthen the weak by weakening the strong.
You cannot lift the wage-earner by pulling down the wage-payer.
You cannot help the poor man by destroying the rich.
You cannot keep out of trouble by spending more than your income.
You cannot further the brotherhood of man by inciting class hatred.
You cannot establish security on borrowed money.
You cannot build character and courage by taking away men’s initiative and independence.
You cannot help men permanently by doing for them what they could and should do for themselves.
From the Ten Cannots by The Reverend William John Henry Boetcker originally published the in 1916 in a leaflet entitled “Lincoln on private property.” One side had words by Abraham Lincoln, the other side had the “Cannots” that Rev. Boetcker wrote. It was republished by the Inside Publishing Company in 1917 and 1938. Rev. Boetcker lived from 1873 to 1962, was raised in Erie, PA and ordained in Brooklyn, NY. “We reach the Outside from the Inside” from: http://www.dkgoodman.com/cannot.html

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Comments
  1. Vicki G says:

    well said…permission to copy and paste a part of it?(the cannots)

  2. sjdixierose says:

    Vicki absolutely! please share:-)

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